Six on Saturday: Patience!

Tulips (nearly!) Tulips are the big opener for my garden show. There are noises backstage and the lights have dimmed, but the curtain’s not raised! Tyger Tyger I cut back the bedraggled penstemons this week and look what I found! Love the green stripes on these hyacinths! Euphorbia They’re ready for the tulips. Come on…

The Greening

Something magical is happening.  Right now, as we speak.  Maybe metres away from where you’re sitting. Can you hear it? I expect it crackles, just a little bit. It is the buds bursting.  One by one by one. In February there were tremulous catkins quivering, palest green and yellow.  It was easy to miss them. …

Sissinghurst at the start of the season

I live about ten minutes’ drive away from Sissinghurst Castle.  In the last 8 years, there has probably never been more than a three-week period when I have not visited.  You might think I would get bored, but no.  There is always lots to see; constant change and flux.  Since Troy Scott-Smith took over as…

Gardening is the best drug

Gardening, like love, is a drug. It’s a therapy, a remedy, a cure, a balm, a tingle, an itch that needs scratching, a rush, a thrill, a trip, a joy, an inspiration, a bolt of lightening, a jolt that starts the heart, a cornucopia of sensory delights, a phantasmagoria, a rainbow, a shimmering vision… Here’s…

Six on Saturday: bare arms in the sun!

In the last couple of weeks I have felt like some of my seedlings: etiolated, stretching my neck out towards the window, but failing to find the sun.  I have been desperate for some extended time in the garden. Yesterday the sun came out. First I’ll show you the hyacinths.  We inherited a lot of…

My pledge not to buy new stuff

I’ve got a bee in my bonnet.  A plastic one. But it’s not just plastic.  It is all unnecessary consumerism-gone-mad purchases. I’m a bit alarmed by the Easter merchandise. You don’t need a purpose-made basket for collecting chocolate eggs. You certainly don’t need an Easter-themed hand-towel. Do you? So why are the shops and garden…

In a vase on Monday: together and apart

I rescued these blue hyacinths from being swallowed whole by my Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae. I initially put my three spikes of hyacinth in a glass jar with some Primula vulgaris. And it looked like this: But I wondered if they might look better in separate jars, like this: I think I prefer them separate….

The gentle art of daydreaming

I have always been a dreamer.  Partly it is just noticing the little things, raindrops, shafts of sunlight, dust-motes, the fluttering of leaves, and partly it is being able to go on lovely little travels in my head when there is not much else going on.  I can fly; I can dive deep into the…

I have jelly in my lupins!

  This post is written in haste because I have just been able to repeat a discovery I made a couple of weeks ago. Water turns to jelly! My step-daughter and I discovered this together when we poked the water in the bird-bath early one morning, and it was gelatinous.  The surface tension was stronger,…

Six on Saturday: sultry purples

As I write, it is snowing heavily.  I rushed out before breakfast to capture these photos, and the light levels were low, so I have ended up with some rather sultry shots. First, there are the hyacinths.  They are a little bit weather-beaten.  They have been in the ground for a few years, so are…

Cultivating a growth mind-set

There may be one too many puns in that title.  My apologies. I think I have already said that I tend to be an optimist.  I was blessed with optimistic parents.  I was brought up with a Northern “you’ll be right” sort of approach to minor disasters.  If you burn your hand on an electric hob ring, you…

In a vase on Monday: the local florist

This post is in praise of the local florist.  We have a few brilliant florists’ nearby, but on Saturday I was in Tenterden, and visited John Barry & Sons.  The owner was run off his feet, but took the time to have a little chat about where his blooms had come from, many of which were UK…