In a vase on Monday: recovered gems

I so loved the arrangement by Cathy, Words and Herbs last week, so I thought I would do something similar with glass bottles and jars.

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There is Hyacinth ‘Woodstock’ (the deeper purple), ‘Jan Bos’ (the pink), a rogue little tulip ‘Passionale’ who escaped by excavations in the raised bed last year, Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae (‘Mrs Robb’s Bonnet’), Crocus ‘Flower Record’, Tulipa hageri ‘Little Beauty’ and Muscari.  I have photographed them from above because this is generally how they catch my eye in passing (they are on the kitchen table). You might have to swipe through these three images if you are looking on a smartphone!

The species tulip, Tulipa hageri ‘Little Beauty’ is one of my favourites for naturalising under trees.  It looks after itself and multiplies every year.  I will be photographing it again when it opens, because it is just stunning, with a bright blue centre, corona of white, and hot pink petals.

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I thought I’d also share my late-baked simnel cake, because it fits with the colours!  Like all my cakes, it’s a little bit rustic!

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If you head over to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden, you can see what other people have found in their gardens this Monday morning!

43 Comments Add yours

  1. Lovely flowers. We have a number of unnamed hyacinths out in the garden that were planted out after people gave us the forced bulbs in pots as Christmas gifts. The Tulipa hageri sounds nice and I look forward to seeing it open.

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    1. Ali says:

      I will keep you posted!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Lisa at Greenbow says:

    A nice gathering of pretty flowers. I like the mauvy purple of the hyacinth.
    Your cake looks interesting too. I haven’t seen anything like that before. Cheers.

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      It’s basically a fruit cake with a layer of marzipan through the middle and more on top. We like marzipan in our house!

      Like

  3. pbmgarden says:

    Lovely rich colors. Great idea to display individual flowers as a collection.

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    1. Ali says:

      And easy for those who don’t possess flower-arranging skills!

      Like

  4. Cathy says:

    Oh Ali, that’s definitely done it, seeeing your Simnel cake! I realised just before we went away that I hadn’t yet made one – but no, it’s never too late, is it?!! Yum yum 🙂 I could vie with you for the rustic-ness of cakes, although a crimped edge and edible flowers doesn’t look rustic to me! Lovely to see your selection of blooms – I am very fond of Little Beauty too and several of the other species tulips too. Must add some more to my next bulb order. Love Woodstock too, and I am pleased to see some of mine coming back again. Thanks for sharing yours

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      Yes, I need to make a list now (and detailed planting map!) of the bulbs needed! This being a need, not a want!

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      1. Cathy says:

        Gosh, I am all for a list of bulbs at this stage but a detailed planting map is not something I have considered for them. Hmm, well I suppose I might have said something like ‘species tulips, main borders’ which comes to the same thing really…

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      2. Ali says:

        That’s generally what I do, then sink my spade into a patch of bulbs that’s already there!

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      3. Cathy says:

        Ooops! 🙂

        Like

      4. Cathy says:

        Oh, meant to suggest perhaps taking a photo when bulbs are flowering…?

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      5. Ali says:

        Yes. That is what I say I will do every year. Some years I might indeed do it. And then between April and October I manage to delete the photos!

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      6. Cathy says:

        🙂 Hey ho!

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  5. These are a delight…so much spring beauty on display.

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    1. Ali says:

      Thank you Donna!

      Like

  6. bcparkison says:

    Oh…I can’t wait to see the pink one open.

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  7. Peter Herpst says:

    What a sweet sampling of the abundance of your spring garden; recovered gems indeed! Your simnel cake looks (and I’m sure tastes) divine!

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    1. Ali says:

      Thank you Peter!

      Like

  8. Thanks for identifying all those flowers. It’s nice to know exactly what you used in that beautiful grouping.

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    1. Ali says:

      Thank you Linda! Any excuse to talk about flowers!

      Like

  9. Chloris says:

    Spring flowers make such delightful posies and that is a pretty way of enjoying them.
    Oh that cake looks delicious, I mustn’t linger over it as I’m on a diet.

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      Yes, IAVOM is getting much easier!

      Like

  10. Kris P says:

    Lovely! Seeing all the hyacinths in IAVOM posts has made me long to grow some of my own, even if they’re not bulbs that do well in my area of Southern California. I’m definitely going to plant some species tulips next fall – I grew a few in my former garden and they came back, at least for a time.

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    1. Ali says:

      I would really recommend species tulips – they are good value!

      Like

  11. Cathy says:

    Hi Ali! It is a lovely idea putting just one flower in each vase, showing each of them off to best advantage. 🙂 Love that little tulip. Thanks for the mention too!

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      Yes, because I like to study them and watch them change, just a couple of stems makes that easier.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I love this arrangement of small vases that highlights each bloom. I am making a note of Tulipa hageri ‘Little Beauty’. In general, tulips don’t natural well in the Southeast U.S. However, I am giving it ago with my emperor tulips from this spring, and perhaps this is a candidate to try as well.

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    1. Ali says:

      Definitely my top recommendation! I’m so glad you are tempted!

      Like

  13. AlisonC says:

    That dark hyacinth is delicious, one for next year’s list! A gorgeous snapshot of the season and a very pretty cake too.

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    1. Ali says:

      Thanks Alison!

      Like

  14. Noelle says:

    Gem colours for sure…lovely at this time of year too.

    Like

  15. Heyjude says:

    Hyacinth ‘Woodstock’ is awfully nice. Do you grow your hyacinths in the ground or in pots? And the little tulip may tempt me to plant under the corkscrew hazel. I shall wait and see what it looks like when open 🙂

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      They’re all in the ground. In previous years I’ve grown them in pots, but then planted out. Because they seem happy in my soil, now I just cut out the pot stage. They come back each year, some a little less full, but others just as plump. I can’t really identify what they like: they have done well in clay, but also next to the house in quite thin, gravelly soil. They seem to have liked the cold this year and have kept the show going for a long time.

      Like

      1. Heyjude says:

        I have noticed that when they come back (even in pots) the flowers are thinner. I might try keeping mine in pots in the cold conservatory this winter and see how they go.

        Like

  16. Eliza Waters says:

    Gorgeous colours!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Alison says:

    What a great idea, to give each bloom its own little jar to set it off. Such bright colors!

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      It’s such an easy way to display flowers – snip, fill, dunk – done!

      Like

  18. I LOVE this. These pictures are so beautiful and cheerful. I really love jars.

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  19. I love smaller arrangement in various vases. Interesting, I have never heard of this cake, but it is the fourth time since Easter that I have heard about it. I am definitely intrigued by it.

    Like

    1. Ali says:

      Funnily enough, I am just eating a slice, and it is yum!!

      Like

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