The Rose Garden at the end of June

I wrote a post called The Rose Garden at the start of June, so I thought I should write one about it at the end of June. I’ll go around anti-clockwise, the same way I walked last time.  Rosa ‘Emma Hamilton’ first. She is lush, isn’t she? You can see how in the bottom right of…

New to Blogging? The Pitfalls and the Pleasures

Blogging is not what I thought it would be. I thought it would be a one-way process.  I write, readers read. I soon learnt that it is far more interactive.  If you want others to read your blog, you have to be a bit more extrovert, and put yourself out there.  You have to engage…

Returning the egg boxes

I think it is fair to say that most of the UK got a wake-up call with David Attenborough’s BBC documentary series Blue Planet II.  The image of the pilot whale carrying her dead baby around will, I hope, stay with me forever. I am using that dead baby whale to remind our children not to…

Up to the highest heights

On Sunday we took Stevie for a hang-gliding lesson.  Stevie had made the mistake about a year ago of casually saying it looked fun.  I made a mental note and proudly presented him with a gift voucher for his birthday.  For some reason it has taken some months for him to book it. We all…

Pata Pata

To accompany this post about my cutting patch, I suggest you have a little soundtrack of  Pata Pata by Miriam Mikeba.  This song expresses perfectly how it feels to be waking up to warm temperatures, blue skies and new flowers! I extended my cutting patch this year.  Well, Stevie extended it.  I already had one…

Refresh! How to water well

When most people around the world think of England, they think it rains all the time. In my part of the world, in Kent, (Down South), our average yearly rainfall is 650mm.  Admittedly, in my hometown of Holmfirth, Yorkshire, (Up North*), it is 1,000mm (figures from Met Office).  But compare that to Sydney, which has an…

Minibeasts

I have been having more fun with my macro lens, and thought I would share the pics.  There are quite a lot of marvellous minibeasts here, which I’m hoping nature-types can help me identify.  I have to say that having this lens is adding to my enjoyment of the garden.  I was aware of the…

Getting to know you…

A rose is a long-term investment. There is a substantial layout initially. A good hole should be dug (I love digging holes), and timed so that they are just ready for your bare-root rose to arrive in November.  When you see that magical brown-paper bag waiting by the door when you get home from work,…

Moody Blues

When I wrote the title of this post, it was because of the colours of the flowers, and the overcast conditions.  I got about this many words in, and tried to add images, and that is when my woes began.  I couldn’t upload any images.  I switched between laptop and phone, I used up my…

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Tis strange my Theseus, that these lovers speak of. More strange than true. I never may believe These antique fables, nor these fairy toys. Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason comprehends. The lunatic, the lover and the poet Are of imagination all compact: One sees…

The Oldies

The David Austin English roses have been getting a lot of my attention, but I shouldn’t forget where it all began.  Many of the Plush, crimson English roses have Gallicas in their heritage. I grow three Gallica roses, ‘Charles de Mills’, ‘Tuscany Superb’ and ‘Sissinghurst Castle’. I grew ‘Charles de Mills’ at my old house.  Here…

The Corner of Complete Neglect

We all have one, don’t we? This is mine. It is at the corner of the rose garden, next to the wall of the house.  It is tricky because it is bone-dry and has poor, stony soil that bakes hard to concrete in the summer. We inherited this rather lovely shrub rose, ‘Marjorie Fair’.  The…