Will this post calm me down?

Understanding the basics of Sensory Integration can help us plan a garden that can have calming areas, to balance the alerting areas. There are also some tips for calming yourself in a stressful situation, using the principles of Sensory Integration.

Tripping the Light Fantastic

Sunlight is transformative. Petals and leaves become translucent and their network of veins are revealed. The fine down on stems and buds are illuminated. Sunlight is a transitory and elusive quality in the garden. Which is perhaps why it is so magical.

Diversity

Nature has many different solutions to the problem of how to get a flower pollinated. This post explores the diversity of flower forms, with cups, plates, trap-doors, bells, umbels and more!

Stained Glass

I just thought I would write a little mini post on the wonderful Erodium manescavii, or Heron’s Bill. At first glance this flower looks very like a Hardy Geranium. But the petals are not all the same.  Two of them have stained-glass window markings.  They are like spidery ink across white paper.  The other three petals just…

Many Faces

A couple of days ago I posted about our visit to The Salutation garden, in Mischief Managed. I took so many photos that there were far too many for one post.  I have saved the dahlias for today. The Salutation is the best garden I know for dahlias.  That is not to say there aren’t others…

Reach out and touch me

I have been talking recently about sensory aspects of gardening, with colour and form.  Today it is the turn of texture.  Specifically, flower texture. When I was a child, I liked fluff.  I remember staying in a hotel one night and having an incredibly fluffy blanket.  I kept pulling off bits of wool all night and in…

Another dimension: making use of form

The tagline to my website is ‘the sensory pleasures and earthy delights of gardening’.  What I mean by that is making the most of all the sensory qualities of plants in the garden, in order to really enjoy all it has to offer. Our enjoyment of the garden includes taking in information from all our…

Burning Bright

I posted on Sunday about my visit to Sissinghurst, where I concentrated on form and texture in the rose garden. The Cottage Garden has a very different feel at the height of summer.  Yes, there is form and texture, but mainly it is about the shimmering, simmering colour. I adore Crocosmia, and this orange form sets…

Sissinghurst in fine form

I think it has been four or five weeks since I visited Sissinghurst.  This is unprecedented.  It has just been too hot to do anything other than languish in the shade of my own garden. But the temperature temporarily dipped, so I could move again. The castle is being engulfed by planting. That’s the built…

Prehistoric

Many of my favourite plants come from South Africa.  They are incredibly useful in my bright border, where they like the full sun, tolerate drought, and, most importantly, provide late summer colour. Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is probably the most dramatic.  It may not flower for as long as Helenium, or Rudbeckia, or Echinacea, but its sculptural form…

The Morning Mist

It has been a scorching couple of weeks.  It has been five weeks since our last rainfall.  Then yesterday the heavens opened.  I was driving home under the raincloud, hoping it would come with me all the way home.  It did, and the garden got a much-needed drenching for twenty minutes.  The temperature didn’t drop,…

The Rose Garden at the end of June

I wrote a post called The Rose Garden at the start of June, so I thought I should write one about it at the end of June. I’ll go around anti-clockwise, the same way I walked last time.  Rosa ‘Emma Hamilton’ first. She is lush, isn’t she? You can see how in the bottom right of…