Grottos and seafood

An exploration of the very different colours and textures of the Gironde. Chalky whites and greys are the background to bright splashes of colour from Oleander and Hibiscus, with the wonderful blue shutters popping up in the background.

Drippy

A wet garden is an opportunity! Not only can you admire the sparkles and spangles from water droplets, but flowers get heavy and fall into one another, creating never-seen-before colour combinations…

Dahlia Fashion Shoot

A glossy mag sort of a post. No brainpower needed. Silky textures, rich colour, delicious flower forms. This is flower porn. The tasteful sort.

The Walk to the Boulangerie

We have just returned from a holiday in France.  I got into a habit whilst we were there of walking to the Boulangerie for bread and croissants each morning.  Before anyone else was awake. I woke up at about seven, pulled on my clothes oh-so-quietly, made a cup of tea oh-so-quietly, and crept across the…

Mischief Managed

We just had a lovely day out.  I can persuade our daughters to enjoy a garden visit if there is a) cake or b) the beach at the end of it.  Today it was b). We visited The Salutation in Sandwich, and ended up in Broadstairs, much as we did in A Grand Day Out a couple…

Reach out and touch me

I have been talking recently about sensory aspects of gardening, with colour and form.  Today it is the turn of texture.  Specifically, flower texture. When I was a child, I liked fluff.  I remember staying in a hotel one night and having an incredibly fluffy blanket.  I kept pulling off bits of wool all night and in…

Supersonic

I am mixing my senses here, but I do tend to a degree of synaesthesia when describing colour and its intensity.  Whilst supersonic really relates to speed, it is the word that keeps coming to me when I look at these pictures of the bright border and need a word to describe the intensity of…

Infatuation

It is easy to think that the garden has done what it is going to do this summer.  We can only deadhead spent blooms and keep things watered, and continue to keep things going into autumn. And then it does this! Which very quickly become this: And then they do this! And you just can’t…

Sissinghurst in fine form

I think it has been four or five weeks since I visited Sissinghurst.  This is unprecedented.  It has just been too hot to do anything other than languish in the shade of my own garden. But the temperature temporarily dipped, so I could move again. The castle is being engulfed by planting. That’s the built…

Prehistoric

Many of my favourite plants come from South Africa.  They are incredibly useful in my bright border, where they like the full sun, tolerate drought, and, most importantly, provide late summer colour. Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is probably the most dramatic.  It may not flower for as long as Helenium, or Rudbeckia, or Echinacea, but its sculptural form…

The Morning Mist

It has been a scorching couple of weeks.  It has been five weeks since our last rainfall.  Then yesterday the heavens opened.  I was driving home under the raincloud, hoping it would come with me all the way home.  It did, and the garden got a much-needed drenching for twenty minutes.  The temperature didn’t drop,…

Vintage Silk

As you may have noticed, I have a thing for bright and deeply saturated colour.  But I have other weaknesses too.  Back in autumn I was seduced by a certain supplier of tulip bulbs and gave into temptation.  I decided to try some sun-faded tones: vintage silk alongside my usual velvet and satin. I selected…