Tickled Pink

I don’t think of myself as a particularly girly girl, and throughout my life I have almost avoided pink. Yet when I look around my rose garden, I see pink everywhere. And yes, I am tickled pink.

Layers of Loveliness

I generally plant roses and herbaceous perennials in groups of three. This gives each variety a presence in the border: their flowers are in sufficient number to make an impact. I like the way they form clear hummocks, like hills, through the border. Their outlines remind me of a child’s drawing of overlapping hills.

Mouth-watering

This peony is mouth-watering. There is a lightness to intersectional peonies. Where herbaceous peonies are taffeta and tulle, intersectional peonies are a swishy silk skirt on bare legs.

Pops and Neutrals

I am a ‘colour pop’ kind of a girl. But occasionally, with a light frost, I am forced to focus on the neutrals. With the aid of my new book all about colour, I can now distinguish my buff from my fawn!

Pink Pops

Let’s celebrate those who dare to be different. Who let their madness shine through. Who receive a frosty reception but do it anyway.

Tripping the Light Fantastic

Sunlight is transformative. Petals and leaves become translucent and their network of veins are revealed. The fine down on stems and buds are illuminated. Sunlight is a transitory and elusive quality in the garden. Which is perhaps why it is so magical.

Sparkle

As the world turns, the light is changing.  I am an early riser, and if I get up at 5am, I wake up to a gentle dappled light which dances against the curtains and invites me outside. But by 6am, the bread machine beeps, and Ruby knows it is time for breakfast.  She nuzzles me…

A breath of fresh air

Today we were joined by my fabulous step-daughter, who is with us for four weeks.  She helped me choose the photos for this post, and chatted to me throughout.  So there might be some weird sentences as I accidentally type random words from our conversations. Here is the view from the table. The light coming…

Comparing the growth habit of different roses

A reader asked if I could show photos of the growth habit of the David Austin English roses ‘Lady Emma Hamilton’ and ‘Roald Dahl’.  I thought I would go the whole hog and write a post about the growth habit of all my roses. I do favour David Austin English roses because: they have the…

The garden that keeps on giving

I expected the rose garden to be lovely in June.  I had planned for continuous succession of flowers, but I didn’t realise it would be delighting me quite so much in July. I am taking a ridiculous number of photos. It’s just that there are so many lovely textures.  Ticklish ones… Soft, bouncy ones… Bibbly-bobbly…

The Rose Garden at the end of June

I wrote a post called The Rose Garden at the start of June, so I thought I should write one about it at the end of June. I’ll go around anti-clockwise, the same way I walked last time.  Rosa ‘Emma Hamilton’ first. She is lush, isn’t she? You can see how in the bottom right of…

Getting to know you…

A rose is a long-term investment. There is a substantial layout initially. A good hole should be dug (I love digging holes), and timed so that they are just ready for your bare-root rose to arrive in November.  When you see that magical brown-paper bag waiting by the door when you get home from work,…